Saturday, May 31, 2008

His name is Ulrich Rosenzweig

Sad links I provide today. Rachel, who is an American living in Rio writes on her blog today about Ulrich Rosenzweig, a elderly gentleman who lived in her building and was murdered. Rachel touches a bit about violence in Brazil and writes a nice tribute to Mr. Rosenzweig, recounting his story. Mr. Rosenzweig was a Holocaust survivor who came to Brazil after the war and established a new life for himself and his family. Very sad albeit interesting reading.

11 comments:

Ms Calabaza said...

Sad story but good reading.

Daniel @ Garanhuns said...

Violence is one of the darkest realities of Brazil. And the story reminded me so much of this family my mother was raised with in Cuba, that had fled under Europe under similar circumstances.

Agustin Farinas said...

Daniel,
recently we tried to visit Brazil at the Foz the Iguazu entry point on our motorcycle, and were turned back because we were Cubans. We had Argentine documents showing we were 8 year old legal residents of Argentina with legal documents but were told Mercosur rules do not apply to us and we needed a visa to enter. We only wanted to see the falls from the Brazilean side and told the people at the customs office, but to no avail, they simply told us NO.
My wife told them off in no uncertain terms and added that the next time Brazil faced an oppponent in the World Cup we will cheer for whomever the opponent was and hoped Brasil will lose. Aside from calling Lula a communist SOB to their face also. Oh well, I only wanted to see the falls from the other side because we were too far from the beach for me to care about visiting anyway.

Daniel @ Garanhuns said...

Agustin
Sorry to hear about that. I can tell you that in my experience, it all depends on who/ which agent you get. Some people are very helpful, and some are nitpicky. I know we had a similar problem with our coach, who was Argentinian, but had US passport. Because he had the US passport he needed to get a visa as an American and could not come in under Mercosul. When he went back to clear it up, the second agent said it really was not necessary, it was just one agent trying to be a jerk.

Agustin Farinas said...

Daniel,
it was very sad because I happen to be an American citizen too even though I have Argentiniean legal residence and proper docuemnts. But since when you acquire the residence papers here, you have to present a Cuban birth certificate, the papers read "born in Cuba" (I left Cuba in 1960)so the rules were applied. As the Custom agent said "as regras son as regras y eu no posso fazer nada, mais ainda eu gosto dos cubanos"
My reply:
Eu gostaba dos brasileros porque seu musica e muito bonita y as pessoas sao muito parecidos as cubanos, mais agora tehho que revisar minha opinao acerca do seu pais. Nunca mais voltare no Brasil. Obrigado y chao"

Daniel @ Garanhuns said...

Agustin,
I understand if you make a stand, my father probably would have done the same thing, but it is like they say, don't write off the whole lot because of the attitude of one (or a few). You could have returned the very next day, and found an agent that would have let you through. Federal workers are the same everywhere, like trying to send something at the Post Office.

Agustin Farinas said...

Daniel,
actually after a few days I changed my mind and somehow dismissed the whole thing as stupid; however somehow the damage has been done in my mind and the image I had of Brazileans went down the tube. It may be unfair but I am older now and more recalcitrant, you could say.
Since I do not like Lula either ( I find him corrupt) because he is a good friend of Castro, and not of the Cuban people, it was not hard to make the connection.
We may one day still try with the Cedula Federal of Argentina that does not have the place of birth, to get in and go to the ocean which was my original idea in the first place.
I lived in Cuba very close to the ocean and have a great longing for it. (saudade as they would say there). I wanted to go to Bombas and relish in the warm water, then have some shrimp salad and a good beer after a great ride on my motorcycle while getting there.
Enjoy some good Brazilean music at night in a boite, and sleep to the sound of the ocean in the background.
Where live in Argentina is beautiful, but of a different kind. Is in the Sierras, with lots of hills and plenty of curvy roads (great for a motorcycle rider) many pine trees, and very clean air. It snows a little in the winter (rarely) and we have cool temperatures.
But I am a Cuban guajiro at heart since I was born in the country side in a sugar mill and so I love it here within a small town atmosphere. I have a good vegetable garden, many trees including walnuts and oranges, flowers and a small villa like the kind you would find in Andalucia. I love the place and is far from the city hub-bub that annoys me. So far is cheap to operate because I am retired from USA, so is affordable, but this is Argentina and anything can happen at any time, even the most unusual thing that you can imagine.

Daniel @ Garanhuns said...

Agustin:
As far as Lula goes, I say he is either "aware" of all the "safadeza" (shenanigans) and is an acomplice or he is oblivious to it all, therefore incompetent. Where I live in ?Brazil is a very small town, and the pictures I have sent around many have told me it reminds them of "el campo" in Cuba.All the best and thanks for the visits to the blog.

Agustin Farinas said...

Daniel,
whereabouts in Brasil is this little town you live in, and how did you ever get there from the US? That must be a very interesting story.
I think Lula is like the old President in Cuba named Machado, who was called Tiburon, because he ate but he splashed the water too. By this I think they meant he robbed and was corrupt, but did not mind if his friends did it too.Sounds like good old Lula to me. But hey, they voted him in, right? Now the people there will have to wait a few more years for new elections. From what I read about the subject he seems to be popular with poor folks.

Daniel @ Garanhuns said...

Would you believe I live in Lula's hometown? I live in a place called Garanhuns, in Pernambuco. Lula was born in a smaller town, today known as Caetes, but at the time was part of Garanhuns. Lula is very poular with the poor,because he was one of them. The really radical faction of the left actually feels forgotten and abandoned by Lula. The communist party here is always bashing him when ever he takes a stance that favors business or "the west". He made a comment some years back that the poor had to stop blaming the US and others for all their problems and pick themselves up to get ahead and that really upset the left.

Here is an interesting item about Lula being President: It disproves the "theory" that only the rich get ahead in Brazil. Lula was born in the poorest region of the country. He had little education. He did not have the "advantages" of an easy life. He left the north to start a new life in Sao Paulo, like so many other families (he was a young boy, his family left) Yet, he became President. Not even in the US can you see that happen. When was the last "self made" President, with no degree? Yet the parties of the left say Brazil lacks opportunity.

The "best" party here, the one I would belong to if i had a vote is known as "Democratas". I know I know delicious irony, but they are like a party of what I like to describe as somewhat socially permissive Republicans and economically responsible Democrats with a dash of Libertarians.

Iwill tackle how I ended up here at another time.
All the best to you and yous:)

Agustin Farinas said...

Daniel,
not even the most famous Brazilean of all time Pele, is safe from crime in Brazil!
I just read about his fleecing outside of Santos when about 10 kids ina gang, stopped his car and robbed him. Wow!.
No one can tell me these guy did not know who they were robbing!
Pele's familiar face is internationally recognized anywhere in the world. Now I know crime in Brazil is completly out of control.